A candidate prostate cancer susceptibility gene at chromosome 17p

@article{Tavtigian2001ACP,
  title={A candidate prostate cancer susceptibility gene at chromosome 17p},
  author={Sean V. Tavtigian and Jacques Simard and David H.-F. Teng and Vicki Abtin and Michelle L. Baumgard and Audrey Beck and Nicola J. Camp and Arlene R. Carillo and Yang Chen and Priya Dayananth and Marc Desrochers and Martine Dumont and James M. Farnham and David Frank and Cheryl Frye and Siavash Ghaffari and Jamila Gupte and Rong Hu and Diana Iliev and Teresa Janecki and Edward N. Kort and K Laity and A Leavitt and Gilles Leblanc and Jodi McArthur-Morrison and Amy Marie Pederson and Brandon Penn and Kelly T. Peterson and Julia E. Reid and S K Richards and M Schroeder and Richard Smith and Sarah C. Snyder and Brad Swedlund and Jeffrey J. Swensen and Alun Thomas and Martine Tranchant and Ann-Marie Woodland and Fernand Labrie and Mark H. Skolnick and Susan L. Neuhausen and Johanna M Rommens and Lisa Anne Cannon-Albright},
  journal={Nature Genetics},
  year={2001},
  volume={27},
  pages={172-180}
}
It is difficult to identify genes that predispose to prostate cancer due to late age at diagnosis, presence of phenocopies within high-risk pedigrees and genetic complexity. A genome-wide scan of large, high-risk pedigrees from Utah has provided evidence for linkage to a locus on chromosome 17p. We carried out positional cloning and mutation screening within the refined interval, identifying a gene, ELAC2, harboring mutations (including a frameshift and a nonconservative missense change) that… Expand
A candidate gene approach within the susceptibility region PCaP on 1q42.2-43 excludes deleterious mutations of the PCTA-1 gene to be responsible for hereditary prostate cancer.
TLDR
PCTA-1 is not a classical high risk gene with deleterious mutations predisposing to hereditary prostate cancer, and its contribution to prostate cancer susceptibility as a low risk factor in sporadic disease has to be assessed in larger samples by association studies. Expand
Hereditary prostate cancer in Finland: fine-mapping validates 3p26 as a major predisposition locus
TLDR
Fine-mapping of these two critical regions at high resolution with 39 microsatellite markers provides strong evidence for the existence of a prostate cancer susceptibility gene at 3p26 in Finnish prostate cancer families. Expand
Evaluation of DLC1 as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene: mutation screen and association study.
TLDR
The first mutation screen and association study of DLC1 in genomic DNA samples from hereditary and sporadic prostate cancer patients suggests that DLC1 is unlikely to play an important role in prostate cancer susceptibility. Expand
Polymorphisms in the prostate cancer susceptibility gene HPC2/ELAC2 in multiplex families and healthy controls.
TLDR
There is, however, little evidence for excess clustering of the T allele within the multiplex families known to be segregating this allele, and there is no evidence for linkage of prostate cancer to the HPC2/ELAC2 region of chromosome 17p11.2 in these families. Expand
Mutation screening and association study of RNASEL as a prostate cancer susceptibility gene
TLDR
Due to the low frequency of germline mutations present in the sample, RNASEL does not have a significant impact on prostate cancer susceptibility in the German population, and it is not consistent with a high penetrance of deleterious R NASEL mutations. Expand
Analysis of the RNASEL gene in familial and sporadic prostate cancer.
TLDR
It is suggested that polymorphic changes within the RNASEL gene may be associated with increased risk of familial but not sporadic PC. Expand
Genetic linkage of prostate cancer risk to the chromosome 3 region bearing FHIT.
TLDR
The results strongly suggest involvement of germline variations of FHIT in prostate cancer risk and a recessive mode of inheritance. Expand
Identification of germline MLH1 alterations in familial prostate cancer.
TLDR
According to the present results, MLH1 does not have a major role in PRCA causation in Finland and is not implicated in the development of PRCA in Finland. Expand
HOXB13 is a susceptibility gene for prostate cancer: results from the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics (ICPCG)
TLDR
It is demonstrated that the HOXB13 G84E mutation is present in ~5 % of prostate cancer families, predominantly of European descent, and this allele and others like it could form the basis for early, targeted screening of men at elevated risk for this common, clinically heterogeneous cancer. Expand
Localization of a prostate cancer predisposition gene to an 880-kb region on chromosome 22q12.3 in Utah high-risk pedigrees.
TLDR
Fine mapping and localization of the chromosome 22q region is done using a pedigree-specific recombinant mapping approach in 14 informative, high-risk Utah pedigrees with evidence for segregating predisposition to prostate cancer. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 56 REFERENCES
Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Locus on Chromosome 1q: a Confirmatory Study
TLDR
The data confirm that chromosome 1q24-25 is likely to contain a prostate cancer susceptibility gene that is relevant to hereditary prostate cancer. Expand
The complete BRCA2 gene and mutations in chromosome 13q-linked kindreds
TLDR
The complete coding sequence and exonic structure of BRCA2 is determined, and its pattern of expression is examined, and a mutational analysis of B RCA2 in families selected on the basis of linkage analysis and/or the presence of one or more cases of male breast cancer is reported. Expand
Evidence for a rare prostate cancer-susceptibility locus at chromosome 1p36.
TLDR
It is concluded that a significant proportion of these families with both a high risk for PC and a family member with BC show linkage to the 1p36 region. Expand
Evidence for a prostate cancer-susceptibility locus on chromosome 20.
TLDR
Evidence is found for a PRCA susceptibility locus in a subset of families that is distinct from the groups more likely to be linked to previously identified loci, and the strongest evidence of linkage was evident with the pedigrees having <5 family members affected with prostate cancer. Expand
Evidence for a prostate cancer susceptibility locus on the X chromosome.
TLDR
Evidence for genetic locus heterogeneity was observed and genetic mapping of the locus represents an important initial step in the identification of an X-linked gene implicated in the aetiology of HPC. Expand
Predisposing gene for early-onset prostate cancer, localized on chromosome 1q42.2-43.
There is genetic predisposition associated with >=10% of all cancer of the prostate (CaP). By means of a genomewide search on a selection of 47 French and German families, parametric andExpand
Prostate cancer susceptibility locus HPC1 in Utah high-risk pedigrees.
TLDR
Evidence for linkage to HPC1 is examined in a set of 41 extended multi-case prostate cancer pedigrees containing 440 prostate cancer cases, suggesting that the linkage evidence may be lower than expected given the power of the resource due to a high sporadic rate in the large Utah pedigree. Expand
A genomic scan of families with prostate cancer identifies multiple regions of interest.
TLDR
Overall, this genomic scan suggests that there are multiple prostate cancer loci responsible for the hereditary form of this common and complex disease and that stratification by a variety of factors will be required for identification of all relevant genes. Expand
Combined analysis of hereditary prostate cancer linkage to 1q24-25: results from 772 hereditary prostate cancer families from the International Consortium for Prostate Cancer Genetics.
  • J. Xu
  • Biology, Medicine
  • American journal of human genetics
  • 2000
TLDR
Although HPC1 accounts for only a small proportion of all families affected by hereditary prostate cancer, it appears to play a more prominent role in the subset of families with several members affected at an early age and with male-to-male disease transmission. Expand
Genetics of prostate cancer: too many loci, too few genes.
TLDR
HPC2/ELAC2 seems well established, therefore, as the first prostate cancer–susceptibility gene characterized by positional cloning (Tavtigian et al. 2000), and intriguing lessons for those in the field are offered, suggesting new ways to approach the difficult problem of understanding prostate cancer susceptibility. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...