A bilayer small diameter in vitro vascular model for evaluation of drug induced vascular injury.

Abstract

In pre-clinical safety studies, drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) is defined as an adverse response to a drug characterized by degenerative and hyperplastic changes of endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells. Inflammation may also be seen, along with extravasation of red blood cells into the smooth muscle layer (i.e., hemorrhage). Drugs that cause DIVI are often discontinued from development after considerable cost has occurred. An in vitro vascular model has been developed using endothelial and smooth muscle cells in co-culture across a porous membrane mimicking the internal elastic lamina. Arterial flow rates of perfusion media within the endothelial chamber of the model induce physiologic endothelial cell alignment. Pilot testing with a drug known to cause DIVI induced extravasation of red blood cells into the smooth muscle layer in all devices with no extravasation seen in control devices. This engineered vascular model offers the potential to evaluate candidate drugs for DIVI early in the discovery process. The physiologic flow within the co-culture model also makes it candidate for a wide variety of vascular biology investigations.

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Cite this paper

@article{Hoganson2016ABS, title={A bilayer small diameter in vitro vascular model for evaluation of drug induced vascular injury.}, author={David M Hoganson and Eric B Finkelstein and Gwen E. Owens and James C. Hsiao and Kurt Y Eng and Katherine M. Kulig and Ernest S. Kim and Tatiana Kniazeva and Irina Pomerantseva and Craig M. Neville and James R. Turk and Bernard Fermini and Jeffrey T. Borenstein and Joseph Phillip Vacanti}, journal={Biomicrofluidics}, year={2016}, volume={10 5}, pages={054116} }