A beaked bird from the Jurassic of China

@article{Hou1995ABB,
  title={A beaked bird from the Jurassic of China},
  author={Lian-hai Hou and Zhonghe Zhou and Larry D. Martin and Alan Feduccia},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1995},
  volume={377},
  pages={616-618}
}
DISCOVERY of avian remains close to the age of Archaeopteryx in the Liaoning Province of northeastern China provides the earliest evidence for a beaked, edentulous bird. The associated wing skeleton retains the primitive pattern found in Archaeopteryx, including a manus with unfused carpal elements and long digits. Two leg skeletons from the same site also show an Archaeopteryxlevel of morphology, and provide the earliest indisputable evidence for a covering of body contour feathers. These… Expand
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