A Worksite Vegan Nutrition Program Is Well-Accepted and Improves Health-Related Quality of Life and Work Productivity

@article{Katcher2010AWV,
  title={A Worksite Vegan Nutrition Program Is Well-Accepted and Improves Health-Related Quality of Life and Work Productivity},
  author={Heather Ilene Katcher and Hope R. Ferdowsian and Valerie J. Hoover and Joshua Cohen and Neal D Barnard},
  journal={Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism},
  year={2010},
  volume={56},
  pages={245 - 252}
}
Background/Aims: Vegetarian and vegan diets are effective in preventing and treating several chronic diseases. [...] Key Method Methods: Employees of a major insurance corporation with a body mass index ≧25 kg/m2 and/or a previous diagnosis of type 2 diabetes received either weekly group instruction on a low-fat vegan diet (n = 68) or received no diet instruction (n = 45) for 22 weeks.Expand
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The present study suggests that a worksite vegan nutrition programme increases intakes of protective nutrients, such as fibre, folate and vitamin C, and decreases intakes of total fat, saturated fat and cholesterol. Expand
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Despite its greater influence on macronutrient intake, a low-fat, vegan diet has an acceptability similar to that of a more conventional diabetes diet, and appears to be no barrier to its use in medical nutrition therapy. Expand
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