A Well-Preserved Archaeopteryx Specimen with Theropod Features

@article{Mayr2005AWA,
  title={A Well-Preserved Archaeopteryx Specimen with Theropod Features},
  author={Gerald Mayr and Burkhardt Pohl and Dieter Stefan Peters},
  journal={Science},
  year={2005},
  volume={310},
  pages={1483 - 1486}
}
A nearly complete skeleton of Archaeopteryx with excellent bone preservation shows that the osteology of the urvogel is similar to that of nonavian theropod dinosaurs. The new specimen confirms the presence of a hyperextendible second toe as in dromaeosaurs and troodontids. Archaeopteryx had a plesiomorphic tetraradiate palatine bone and no fully reversed first toe. These observations provide further evidence for the theropod ancestry of birds. In addition, the presence of a hyperextendible… 
Comment on "A Well-Preserved Archaeopteryx Specimen with Theropod Features"
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The statistical support for the phylogenetic hypothesis that birds, or avian flight, originated twice is investigated and it is shown that it is no better supported by available morphological character data than the hypothesis of a single avian origin.
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It is argued that statistical support for the proposed phylogeny is weak, but the monophyly of Aves favored by most current researchers is also weakly supported, and it is believed that the statistical comparisons made by Corfe and Butler challenge the hypothesis regarding the ancestry of birds.
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It is argued that statistical support for the proposed phylogeny is weak, but the monophyly of Aves favored by most current researchers is also weakly supported, and it is believed that the statistical comparisons made by Corfe and Butler challenge the hypothesis regarding the ancestry of birds.
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