A Unified Model for Ferritin Iron Loading by the Catalytic Center: Implications for Controlling “Free Iron” during Oxidative Stress

@article{Watt2013AUM,
  title={A Unified Model for Ferritin Iron Loading by the Catalytic Center: Implications for Controlling “Free Iron” during Oxidative Stress},
  author={Richard K. Watt},
  journal={ChemBioChem},
  year={2013},
  volume={14}
}
  • R. Watt
  • Published 4 March 2013
  • Chemistry, Medicine
  • ChemBioChem
IRONING OUT THE DIFFERENCES: A unified model shows that the catalytic centers of human H ferritin and archaeal P. furiosus ferritin load iron according to the same mechanism. This model could help our understanding of the processes of controlling the various subcellular concentrations of iron during inflammation. 
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TLDR
Direct, mass-specific evidence of the prompt formation of mono- and poly-iron FeIV=O (ferryl) species on the surface of aqueous FeCl2 microjets exposed to gaseous H2O2 or O3 beams is presented, suggesting that interfacial Fenton and Fenton-like chemistries could play a more significant role than hitherto envisioned.
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