A Troublesome Inheritance: Nicholas Wade's Botched Interpretation of Human Genetics, History, and Evolution

@inproceedings{Fuentes2014ATI,
  title={A Troublesome Inheritance: Nicholas Wade's Botched Interpretation of Human Genetics, History, and Evolution},
  author={Agust{\'i}n Fuentes},
  year={2014}
}
Humans are still evolving, genetic sequences are important, and populations of humans difffer from one another in many ways, including patterns of allelic variation. These facts are not debatable; they are true—but none of them are accurately discussed or represented in Nicholas Wade’s book A Troublesome Inheritance: Genes, Race and Human History. Wade argues that there are defijinable and genetically identifijiable groups we can describe and label as biological races in humans today. He does… 

Anthropological perspectives on genomic data, genetic ancestry, and race.

A broad overview on understanding of race given the new discoveries in genetics/genomics is provided and examples of how these types of data continue to impact social and legal understandings of race are provided.

Anthropological perspectives on genomic data, genetic ancestry, and race.

A broad overview on understanding of race given the new discoveries in genetics/genomics is provided and examples of how these types of data continue to impact social and legal understandings of race are provided.

Isolation by Distance and the Problem of the Twenty-First Century

This article reviews isolation-by-distance models in population genetics and the use of these models in the modern problem of human difference and proposes combining Du Boisian demography with Darwinian evolutionary biology to address the shortcomings in the scientific critique of race.

Isolation by Distance and the Problem of the Twenty-First Century

This article presents a historical and conceptual review of isolation-by-distance models in population genetics and the use of these models in the modern problem of human difference, and proposes a new racial formation theory to understand the more general consequences of racism on genes and health outcomes.

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES

Non-Darwinian estimation: my ancestors, my genes' ancestors.

Attempts to describe the pattern of genetic variation in the human species generally, including "recreational" genomics, the genome-based estimation of the ancestry of individuals rest on subtle concepts of variation, time, and ancestry that are perhaps not widely appreciated.

Biological races in humans.

  • A. Templeton
  • Biology
    Studies in history and philosophy of biological and biomedical sciences
  • 2013

Race reconciled?: How biological anthropologists view human variation.

In May 2007, the Maxwell Museum and Department of Anthropology of the University of New Mexico hosted a symposium entitled, ‘‘Race Reconciled?: How BiologicalAnthropologists View Human Variation’’, attended by scholars who specialize in human biol-ogy, genetics, forensics, bioarchaeology, and paleoanthro-pology.

What are genes “for” or where are traits “from”? What is the question?

This paper illustrates how the Mendelian model has tacitly encouraged the idea that the authors can explain complexity by reducing it to enumerable genes, and reflects the tension between reductionism as the current “modus operandi” of science, and the emerging knowledge of the nature of complex traits.

Human Biodiversity: Genes, Race, and History

In "Human Biodiversity", Marks has attempted to distill from a centuries-long debate what has been learned and remains to be learned about the biological differences within and among human groups.

A Map of Recent Positive Selection in the Human Genome

A set of SNPs is developed that can be used to tag the strongest ∼250 signals of recent selection in each population, and it is found that by some measures the authors' strongest signals of selection are from the Yoruba population.

Evolution in Four Dimensions: Genetic, Epigenetic, Behavioral, and Symbolic Variation in the History of Life

In Evolution in Four Dimensions, Eva Jablonka and Marion Lamb argue that there is more to heredity than genes and offers a richer, more complex view of evolution than the gene-based, one-dimensional view held by many today.

Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

An analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe shows that much genetic variation is geographically continuous.

How race becomes biology: embodiment of social inequality.

  • C. Gravlee
  • Medicine
    American journal of physical anthropology
  • 2009
A model for explaining how racial inequality becomes embodied-literally-in the biological well-being of racialized groups and individuals is presented, which requires a shift in the way the critique of race as bad biology is articulate.

Revisiting race in a genomic age

Interdisciplinary scholars join forces to examine the new social, political, and ethical concerns that are attached to how the authors think about emerging technologies and their impact on current conceptions of race and identity in the Genomic Age.