A Transcriptomic Signature of the Hypothalamic Response to Fasting and BDNF Deficiency in Prader-Willi Syndrome

@article{Bochukova2018ATS,
  title={A Transcriptomic Signature of the Hypothalamic Response to Fasting and BDNF Deficiency in Prader-Willi Syndrome},
  author={Elena G. Bochukova and Katherine Lawler and Sophie Croizier and Julia M Keogh and Nisha Patel and Garth Strohbehn and Kitty K. Lo and Jack Humphrey and Anita C S Hokken-Koelega and Layla Damen and Stephany H. Donze and Sebastien G. Bouret and Vincent Plagnol and I Sadaf Farooqi},
  journal={Cell Reports},
  year={2018},
  volume={22},
  pages={3401 - 3408}
}

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...

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