A Tractable Stochastic Model of Correlated Link Failures Caused by Disasters

@article{Tapolcai2018ATS,
  title={A Tractable Stochastic Model of Correlated Link Failures Caused by Disasters},
  author={J{\'a}nos Tapolcai and B{\'a}lazs Vass and Zal{\'a}n Heszberger and J{\'o}zsef B{\'i}r{\'o} and David Hay and Fernando A. Kuipers and Lajos R{\'o}nyai},
  journal={IEEE INFOCOM 2018 - IEEE Conference on Computer Communications},
  year={2018},
  pages={2105-2113}
}
In order to evaluate the expected availability of a service, a network administrator should consider all possible failure scenarios under the specific service availability model stipulated in the corresponding service-level agreement. [...] Key Method Furthermore, we introduce a pre-computation process, which enables us to succinctly represent the joint probability distribution of link failures. In particular, we generate, in polynomial time, a quasilinear-sized data structure, with which the joint failure…Expand
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