A Test for Reverse Causality in the Democratic Peace Relationship

@article{Mousseau1999ATF,
  title={A Test for Reverse Causality in the Democratic Peace Relationship},
  author={Michael Mousseau and Yuhang Shi},
  journal={Journal of Peace Research},
  year={1999},
  volume={36},
  pages={639 - 663}
}
Several studies have suggested the possibility of reverse causation in the `democratic peace' relationship: that the well-known extreme rarity of wars between democratic nations may be partially or wholly explained by a negative impact of war on democracy. Three kinds of war-on-regime effects are discussed. Anterior effects are regime changes that occur in preparation for wars; concurrent effects are those that occur during the course of a war; and posterior effects are regime changes that… 

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