A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Comparing Hypertonic Sodium Solutions and Mannitol for Traumatic Brain Injury

@article{Burgess2016ASR,
  title={A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials Comparing Hypertonic Sodium Solutions and Mannitol for Traumatic Brain Injury},
  author={Sarah V Burgess and Riyad Abu-Laban and Richard S. Slavik and Erik N. Vu and Peter J. Zed},
  journal={Annals of Pharmacotherapy},
  year={2016},
  volume={50},
  pages={291 - 300}
}
Objective: To comparatively evaluate hypertonic sodium (HTS) and mannitol in patients following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) on the outcomes of all-cause mortality, neurological disability, intracranial pressure (ICP) change from baseline, ICP treatment failure, and serious adverse events. Data Sources: PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, ClinicalTrials.gov, and WHO ICTRP (World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform) were… 

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