A Systematic Review of Built Environment and Health

@article{Renalds2010ASR,
  title={A Systematic Review of Built Environment and Health},
  author={Arlene Renalds and Tracey H Smith and Patty J. Hale},
  journal={Family \& Community Health},
  year={2010},
  volume={33},
  pages={68–78}
}
The built environment can be considered a foundation for health and wellness. [...] Key Method This review compiled the published research that examined the relationship between built environment and health. Findings from the 23 articles reviewed indicate that neighborhoods that are characterized as more walkable, either leisure-oriented or destination-driven, are associated with increased physical activity, increased social capital, lower overweight, lower reports of depression, and less reported alcohol abuse…Expand
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While walkability has been linked to health-related behaviors and CVD risk factors, the implications of the observed correlations are not yet clear and new theoretical insights, measurement technologies, and built environment changes represent opportunities to enhance the evidence base for bringing health promotion and cardiovascular disease prevention into the conversation. Expand
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Results across reviews were mixed, with heterogeneous effects demonstrated in terms of strength and statistical significance; however, preliminary support was identified for several built environment factors. Expand
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Findings indicate significant race differences in the perceived built environment and that the relationship between the perceivedBuilt environment and physical limitations is conditioned by race, whereby Whites experience greater physical health benefits from more neighborhood conditions/amenities than African Americans. Expand
The Role of the Built Environment on Health Across the Life Course: A Call for CollaborACTION
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This article summarizes the important influence of the built environment on health across the lifecourse and across different behavioral settings (home, neighborhood, and community; workplace; and schools) and calls for collaboration and action from policy makers, health practitioners, nongovernment organizations (NGOs), employers, communities, and other health as well as nonhealth stakeholders to advance health for all. Expand
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Specific attention should be given to address neighborhood and psychosocial barriers when constructing and promoting community trails. Expand
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TLDR
The need for public health and city planning officials to address modifiable neighborhood-level, built-environment characteristics to create more livable residential communities aimed at both addressing factors that may influence unhealthy eating and promoting active, healthy lifestyles in this rapidly growing population is suggested. Expand
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Background Research on neighborhood effects increasingly includes the influences of the built environment on health and social well-being. Objectives In this population-based study in aExpand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Analysis of associations of environmental variables with obesity prevalence and individual body mass index (BMI) among impoverished residents of public housing developments found supportive neighborhood environments were related to lower Obesity prevalence and lower BMI among residents. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
Walkable, mixed-use neighborhood designs can encourage the development of social capital, and respondents living in walkable neighborhoods were more likely to know their neighbors, participate politically, trust others, and be socially engaged. Expand
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