A Study of Perceived Racial Discrimination in Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) and Its Association with Healthcare Utilization and HIV Testing

Abstract

In HPTN 061, a study of Black men who have sex with men (MSM), we evaluated the association of healthcare-specific racial discrimination with healthcare utilization and HIV testing among 1167 HIV-negative participants. Median age was 38 years, 41 % were uninsured, and 38 % had an annual household income <$10,000. Overall, 19 % reported healthcare-specific racial discrimination directed toward family, friend, or self; 61 % saw a healthcare provider in the previous 6 months and 81 % HIV tested within the past year. Healthcare-specific racial discrimination was positively associated with seeing a provider [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.4 (1.0, 2.0)] and HIV testing [AOR = 1.6 (1.1, 2.4)] suggesting that barriers other than racial discrimination may be driving health disparities related to access to medical care and HIV testing among Black MSM. These results contrast with previous studies, possibly due to measurement or cohort differences, strategies to overcome discrimination, or because of greater exposure to healthcare.

DOI: 10.1007/s10461-014-0734-y

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@article{Irvin2014ASO, title={A Study of Perceived Racial Discrimination in Black Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM) and Its Association with Healthcare Utilization and HIV Testing}, author={Robert Irvin and Leo Wilton and Helen Scott and Giovanna Beauchamp and L. Wang and Jesmari Betancourt and Micah E Lubensky and Jacqui Wallace and S. Buchbinder}, journal={AIDS and Behavior}, year={2014}, volume={18}, pages={1272-1278} }