A Structured Approach to Family Intervention After Brain Injury

@article{Kreutzer2002ASA,
  title={A Structured Approach to Family Intervention After Brain Injury},
  author={Jeffrey S. Kreutzer and Stephanie A. Kolakowsky-Hayner and Sarah R Demm and Michelle A. Meade},
  journal={Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation},
  year={2002},
  volume={17},
  pages={349–367}
}
Objective:Given the limitations of the literature, a structured approach to helping families after brain injury is clearly needed. Main Outcome Measures:On the basis of considerable clinical experience and research review, this article describes the Brain Injury Family Intervention (BIFI), developed to address common issues, concerns, and challenges. The foundation of the BIFI is a curriculum that includes 16 intervention topics, self-evaluation tools, and treatment strategies. Conclusions… 
Efficacy of the Brain Injury Family Intervention: Impact on Family Members
TLDR
Investigation provided evidence that a curriculum-based education, skill-building, and support intervention can benefit caregivers for up to 3 months, and showed an increase in met needs, greater satisfaction with services, and reduced burden relative to pretesting.
Helping families to manage challenging behaviour after paediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI): a model approach and review of the literature
Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to review and summarise a small but growing body of literature demonstrating that by embedding intervention within a family context offers the greatest promise
Practical Approaches to Effective Family Intervention After Brain Injury
TLDR
Drawing from the fields of family therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and individual psychotherapy, information is provided to help clinicians effectively serve families to help family members adjust and live fulfilling lives.
A preliminary investigation of the brain injury family intervention: Impact on family members
TLDR
Evidence that family members benefit from interventions designed to meet their unique needs after brain injury is provided, indicating a greater number of met needs and perceptions of fewer obstacles to receiving services post-treatment and at 3 months follow-up.
Working with families following brain injury
TLDR
This paper will summarise some of the existing research literature on caregiver stress following brain injury, consider some theoretical models and concepts relevant to family work, and examine the clinical process of working with families following acquired brain injury.
Impact of the Brain Injury Family Intervention (BIFI) training on rehabilitation providers: A mixed methods study.
TLDR
This mixed methods study aims to demonstrate that a structured three-day training on the BIFI protocol improves providers' knowledge and confidence in working with survivors and families, and that this outcome is sustainable.
A mixed methods evaluation of the Brain Injury Family Intervention.
TLDR
Evidence that the BIFI is perceived as helpful and that treatment methods facilitate achievement of goals is provided, and the investigation suggests that investigators may benefit from using mixed methods to evaluate outcomes, complementing traditional quantitative methods with qualitative approaches.
Removing barriers to rehabilitation: Theory-based family intervention in community settings after brain injury.
  • T. Stejskal
  • Psychology, Medicine
    NeuroRehabilitation
  • 2012
TLDR
The article concludes with an overview of the ideas presented to assist practitioners and systems of care in community-based settings to more effectively intervene with the family system as a whole after brain injury.
Family and home in cognitive rehabilitation after brain injury: The importance of family oriented interventions.
TLDR
It is argued in favour of an increased utilization of family-based intervention programs for the families of brain injured patients - in general and especially in case of utilization of home-based rehabilitative training.
Artículo de revisión Working with families following brain injury
TLDR
This paper will summarise some of the existing research literature on caregiver stress following brain injury, consider some theoretical models and concepts relevant to family work, and examine the clinical process of working with families following acquired brain injury.
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