A Strategic Framework for Responding to Coral Bleaching Events in a Changing Climate

@article{Maynard2009ASF,
  title={A Strategic Framework for Responding to Coral Bleaching Events in a Changing Climate},
  author={Jeffrey A. Maynard and J. E. Johnson and Paul A. Marshall and C. Mark Eakin and Gillian Goby and Heidi Z. Schuttenberg and Claire Spillman},
  journal={Environmental Management},
  year={2009},
  volume={44},
  pages={1-11}
}
The frequency and severity of mass coral bleaching events are predicted to increase as sea temperatures continue to warm under a global regime of rising ocean temperatures. Bleaching events can be disastrous for coral reef ecosystems and, given the number of other stressors to reefs that result from human activities, there is widespread concern about their future. This article provides a strategic framework from the Great Barrier Reef to prepare for and respond to mass bleaching events. The… Expand

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