A Species of Reef Fish that Uses Ultraviolet Patterns for Covert Face Recognition

@article{Siebeck2010ASO,
  title={A Species of Reef Fish that Uses Ultraviolet Patterns for Covert Face Recognition},
  author={U E Siebeck and Amira N Parker and Dennis Sprenger and Lydia M M{\"a}thger and Guy M. Wallis},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={20},
  pages={407-410}
}
The evolutionary and behavioral significance of an animal's color patterns remains poorly understood [1-4], not least, patterns that reflect ultraviolet (UV) light [5]. The current belief is that UV signals must be broad and bold to be detected because (1) they are prone to scattering in air and water, (2) when present, UV-sensitive cones are generally found in low numbers, and (3) long-wavelength-sensitive cones predominate in form vision in those species tested to date [6]. We report a study… Expand
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ABSTRACT Ultraviolet (UV) light occupies the spectral range of wavelengths slightly shorter than those visible to humans. Because of its shorter wavelength, it is more energetic (and potentially moreExpand
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  • Der Ophthalmologe : Zeitschrift der Deutschen Ophthalmologischen Gesellschaft
  • 2017
TLDR
In order to understand how animals of other species see the world, their visual systems must be understood and the animals must be tested in behavioral investigations. Expand
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Thyroid hormone is used to transform the UV cones of young rainbow trout into blue cones, a phenomenon that occurs naturally as the animal grows, to test whether the resulting loss of UV sensitivity affected the animal's foraging performance on Daphnia magna, a prey zooplankton. Expand
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Visual and electrosensory ecology of batoid elasmobranchs
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The results support the potential for color vision in cownose rays and yellow stingrays and future investigations should reveal the extent to which color discrimination is significant in a behavioral context. Expand
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This protocol describes a technique for examining organisms for the presence of UV-reflecting structures and a method for testing whether these cues are used as social signals in the context of mate choice and an example of this technique is presented in which a dichotomous mate choice test exposes sexually receptive individuals to opposite sex individuals whose visual appearance can be manipulated by filters that either transmit full spectrum or block UV wavelengths. Expand
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