A Social Parasite Evolved Reproductive Isolation from Its Fungus-Growing Ant Host in Sympatry

@article{Rabeling2014ASP,
  title={A Social Parasite Evolved Reproductive Isolation from Its Fungus-Growing Ant Host in Sympatry},
  author={Christian Rabeling and Ted R Schultz and Naomi E Pierce and Maur{\'i}cio Bacci},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2014},
  volume={24},
  pages={2047-2052}
}
Inquiline social parasitic ant species exploit colonies of other ant species mainly by producing sexual offspring that are raised by the host. Ant social parasites and their hosts are often close relatives (Emery's rule), and two main hypotheses compete to explain the parasites' evolutionary origins: (1) the interspecific hypothesis proposes an allopatric speciation scenario for the parasite, whereas (2) the intraspecific hypothesis postulates that the parasite evolves directly from its host in… CONTINUE READING
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