A Small World of Citations? The Influence of Collaboration Networks on Citation Practices

@article{Wallace2012ASW,
  title={A Small World of Citations? The Influence of Collaboration Networks on Citation Practices},
  author={Matthew L. Wallace and Vincent Larivi{\`e}re and Yves Gingras},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2012},
  volume={7}
}
This paper examines the proximity of authors to those they cite using degrees of separation in a co-author network, essentially using collaboration networks to expand on the notion of self-citations. While the proportion of direct self-citations (including co-authors of both citing and cited papers) is relatively constant in time and across specialties in the natural sciences (10% of references) and the social sciences (20%), the same cannot be said for citations to authors who are members of… 

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