A Single Exposure to the American Flag Shifts Support Toward Republicanism up to 8 Months Later

@article{Carter2011ASE,
  title={A Single Exposure to the American Flag Shifts Support Toward Republicanism up to 8 Months Later},
  author={Travis J. Carter and Melissa J. Ferguson and Ran Hassin},
  journal={Psychological Science},
  year={2011},
  volume={22},
  pages={1011 - 1018}
}
There is scant evidence that incidental cues in the environment significantly alter people’s political judgments and behavior in a durable way. We report that a brief exposure to the American flag led to a shift toward Republican beliefs, attitudes, and voting behavior among both Republican and Democratic participants, despite their overwhelming belief that exposure to the flag would not influence their behavior. In Experiment 1, which was conducted online during the 2008 U.S. presidential… 

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