A Simple Physiologic Algorithm for Managing Hemodynamics Using Stroke Volume and Stroke Volume Variation: Physiologic Optimization Program

@article{McGee2009ASP,
  title={A Simple Physiologic Algorithm for Managing Hemodynamics Using Stroke Volume and Stroke Volume Variation: Physiologic Optimization Program},
  author={William T. McGee},
  journal={Journal of Intensive Care Medicine},
  year={2009},
  volume={24},
  pages={352 - 360}
}
  • W. McGee
  • Published 6 September 2009
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Intensive Care Medicine
Intravascular volume status and volume responsiveness continue to be important questions for the management of critically ill or injured patients. Goal-directed hemodynamic therapy has been shown to be of benefit to patients with severe sepsis and septic shock, acute lung injury and adult respiratory distress syndrome, and for surgical patients in the operating room. Static measures of fluid status, central venous pressure (CVP), and pulmonary artery occlusion pressure (PAOP) are not useful in… 
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ObjectiveReal-time measurement of stroke volume variation by arterial pulse contour analysis (SVV) is useful in predicting volume responsiveness and monitoring volume therapy in mechanically
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Objective:Passive leg raising (PLR) represents a “self-volume challenge” that could predict fluid response and might be useful when the respiratory variation of stroke volume cannot be used for that
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T he management of hemodynamically unstable patients presents one of the most challenging experiences for the acute care physician, and incorrect treatment or delay in appropriate treatment results
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