A Severe Accident Caused by an Ocellate River Stingray (Potamotrygon motoro) in Central Brazil: How Well Do We Really Understand Stingray Venom Chemistry, Envenomation, and Therapeutics?

@article{Silva2015ASA,
  title={A Severe Accident Caused by an Ocellate River Stingray (Potamotrygon motoro) in Central Brazil: How Well Do We Really Understand Stingray Venom Chemistry, Envenomation, and Therapeutics?},
  author={N. J. da Silva and Kalley Ricardo Clementino Ferreira and Raimundo Nonato Leite Pinto and S. Aird},
  journal={Toxins},
  year={2015},
  volume={7},
  pages={2272 - 2288}
}
Freshwater stingrays cause many serious human injuries, but identification of the offending species is uncommon. The present case involved a large freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae), in the Araguaia River in Tocantins, Brazil. Appropriate first aid was administered within ~15 min, except that an ice pack was applied. Analgesics provided no pain relief, although hot compresses did. Ciprofloxacin therapy commenced after ~18 h and continued seven days. Then… Expand
Neutralization of the edema-forming and myotoxic activities of the venom of Potamotrygon motoro Müller and Henle, 1841 (Chondrichthyes - Potamotrygoninae) by antivenoms and circulating immunoglobulins.
Freshwater stingrays are cartilaginous fish with stingers at the base of their tail. The stinger is covered with an epithelium containing mucous and venom glands. Human envenomation usually occursExpand
Potamotrygon motoro stingray venom induces both neurogenic and inflammatory pain behavior in rodents
TLDR
Investigation of mechanisms of Potamotrygon motoro venom (PmV) that contribute to nociception induction indicate that PmV causes hyperalgesia in rodents which is dependent on the participation of several neuroinflammatory mediators. Expand
Neotropical freshwater stingrays (Chondrichthyes – Potamotrygoninae): biology, general features and envenomation
TLDR
Public health authorities should plan measures aimed at the treatment and epidemiologic reporting of stingray envenomation so as to encourage, and provide a basis for, the relevant organs to implement measures to raise environmental awareness, train health professionals to treat victims of en venomation and undertake studies to produce specific serum therapies. Expand
Transcriptomic Characterization of the South American Freshwater Stingray Potamotrygon motoro Venom Apparatus
TLDR
A detailed transcriptomic characterization of the venom gland of the South American freshwater stingray Potamotrygon motoro indicated an independent recruitment of the hyaluronidase into the stingray venom relative to that of venomous bony fish. Expand
Caracterização biológica do muco epidérmico da arraia de água doce Paratrygon aiereba
TURÍBIO, Thompson de Oliveira. Biological characterization of the epidermic mucus of freshwater stringray Paratrygon aiereba. 2018. 85p. Tese (Doutorado em tecnologia nuclear) – Instituto deExpand
Stingray (Potamotrygon rex) maturity is associated with inflammatory capacity of the venom
TLDR
The results described here show that the nociception is mainly induced by venom from young female stingrays, and the composition of the venom of P. rex is influenced by the stage of maturity of the stingray, modulating the production of peptides and proteins capable of acting on leukocytes‐endothelial interactions and favoring neutrophil infiltration to the damage tissue. Expand
Aquatic antagonists: stingray injury update.
TLDR
Most stingray injuries can be treated with hot water immersion, wound debridement, and prophylactic antibiotics, while some may require more extensive treatment and surgical intervention at a tertiary care center. Expand
Hallux amputation after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon.
TLDR
A case of bacterial infection and hallux necrosis, after a freshwater stingray injury in the Brazilian Amazon, which eventually required amputation. Expand
Delayed healthcare and secondary infections following freshwater stingray injuries: risk factors for a poorly understood health issue in the Amazon.
TLDR
In this study, work-related injuries and >24 hours from being stung until receiving medical care were independently and significantly associated with the risk of secondary infection. Expand
Cross-reactivity between Potamotrygon motoro antivenoms and dorsal and stinger extracts of others stingrays (Chondrichthyes: Potamotrygonidae) from the Amazon basin
TLDR
Results show that the dorsal extract was as immunogenic as the stinger extract and induced high levels of antibodies, which reacted with homologous and heterologous antigens, indicating that both types of extract may be suitable for use in the production of antivenom to treat victims of envenomation by stingrays. Expand
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 109 REFERENCES
Injuries by marine and freshwater stingrays: history, clinical aspects of the envenomations and current status of a neglected problem in Brazil
TLDR
Historical aspects of injuries caused by stingrays in Brazil and their distribution on the coast of São Paulo state and riverine communities of the North, Midwest and Southeast regions were studied. Expand
Freshwater stingrays: study of epidemiologic, clinic and therapeutic aspects based on 84 envenomings in humans and some enzymatic activities of the venom.
TLDR
The results demonstrated that the presence of these enzymes could explain partially the local clinical pictures presented by patients wounded by freshwater stingray. Expand
Tetanus after envenomations caused by freshwater stingrays.
TLDR
The first 2 cases of tetanus after freshwater stingray injuries are reported: a 51-year-old men who had tetanus and recovered without sequel and the second a 67- year-oldMen who had severe Tetanus and a deep, necrotizing soft-tissue infection with sepsis, septic shock and evolution to death. Expand
Biological and biochemical properties of the Brazilian Potamotrygon stingrays: Potamotrygon cf. scobina and Potamotrygon gr. orbignyi.
TLDR
The results showed striking augments of leukocytes rolling and adherent cells to the endothelium of cremaster mice induced by both venoms, providing in vivo evidence of toxic effects for P. scobina and P. orbignyi venoms. Expand
The evaluation, management, and prevention of stingray injuries in travelers.
  • J. Diaz
  • Medicine
  • Journal of travel medicine
  • 2008
TLDR
A retrospective meta‐analysis of the descriptive epidemiology of Stingray injuries, the mechanisms of stingray envenoming, the multiple clinical presentations of stingrays injuries, and the management strategies for stingray injuries is indicated to improve the clinician’s ability to better manage and to prevent stingray injury in travelers. Expand
Histopathological changes induced by extracts from the tissue covering the stingers of Potamotrygon falkneri freshwater stingrays.
TLDR
The venom of P. falkneri is responsible for the development of an early necrosis with mild inflammatory reaction, probably due to direct action of the venom, in patients wounded by stingrays. Expand
Stingray envenomation: a retrospective review of clinical presentation and treatment in 119 cases.
TLDR
It is suggested that hot water immersion was effective in decreasing or eliminating the pain associated with stingray envenomation in the victims of stingray stings presented to the ED over an 8-year period. Expand
Studies on pharmacological properties of mucus and sting venom of Potamotrygon cf. henlei.
TLDR
It is found that mucus and sting venom is toxic to mice having nociceptive, edematogenic and proteolysis activities, and results indicate that the inflammatory cellular influx observed could be triggered by the venom and mucus. Expand
A hyaluronidase from Potamotrygon motoro (freshwater stingrays) venom: isolation and characterization.
TLDR
The P. motoro venom extracted from the sting presented hyaluronidase activity, which was shown to be heat instable, being stabilized by bovine albumin and DTT, and inhibited by Fe(2+), Mn( 2+), Cu(2+) and heparin. Expand
Morphological characterization of the venom secretory epidermal cells in the stinger of marine and freshwater stingrays.
TLDR
Differences between the stingers of the two groups can justify the more severe envenomation accidents with the freshwater species when compared with the marine species. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...