A Seven-degrees-of-freedom Robot-arm Driven by Pneumatic Artificial Muscles for Humanoid Robots

@article{Tondu2005ASR,
  title={A Seven-degrees-of-freedom Robot-arm Driven by Pneumatic Artificial Muscles for Humanoid Robots},
  author={Bertrand Tondu and Serge Ippolito and J{\'e}r{\'e}mie Guiochet and A. Daidie},
  journal={I. J. Robotics Res.},
  year={2005},
  volume={24},
  pages={257-274}
}
Braided pneumatic artificial muscles, and in particular the better known type with a double helical braid usually called the McKibben muscle, seem to be at present the best means for motorizing robotarms with artificial muscles. Their ability to develop high maximum force associated with lightness and a compact cylindrical shape, as well as their analogical behavior with natural skeletal muscle were very well emphasized in the 1980s by the development of the Bridgestone “soft robot” actuated by… CONTINUE READING
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