A SKULL OF THE GIANT BONY‐TOOTHED BIRD DASORNIS (AVES: PELAGORNITHIDAE) FROM THE LOWER EOCENE OF THE ISLE OF SHEPPEY

@article{Mayr2008ASO,
  title={A SKULL OF THE GIANT BONY‐TOOTHED BIRD DASORNIS (AVES: PELAGORNITHIDAE) FROM THE LOWER EOCENE OF THE ISLE OF SHEPPEY},
  author={Gerald Mayr},
  journal={Palaeontology},
  year={2008},
  volume={51}
}
  • G. Mayr
  • Published 1 September 2008
  • Biology, Geography
  • Palaeontology
Abstract:  The first substantial skull of a very large Paleogene bony‐toothed bird (Pelagornithidae) is described from the Lower Eocene London Clay of the Isle of Sheppey in England. The specimen is assigned to Dasornis emuinus (Bowerbank), based on a taxonomic revision of the large London Clay Pelagornithidae. Very large bony‐toothed birds from the London Clay were known previously from fragmentary remains of non‐comparable skeletal elements only, and Dasornis londinensis Owen, Argillornis… 
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