A Review of the Management of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome

@article{Rixe2013ARO,
  title={A Review of the Management of Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome},
  author={J. Rixe and J. Glick and Jodi Brady and R. Olympia},
  journal={The Physician and Sportsmedicine},
  year={2013},
  volume={41},
  pages={19 - 28}
}
Abstract Objective: Patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) is one of the most frequently diagnosed knee conditions in the primary care, orthopedic, and sports medicine settings. Although strength training and stretching programs have traditionally been the mainstay of patient treatment, there are no consensus recovery protocols for runners experiencing PFPS. The purpose of our review is to examine recent literature regarding the efficacy of various treatment modalities in the management of… Expand

Paper Mentions

Interventional Clinical Trial
The purpose of study is to evaluate the efficacy of the electrical muscle stimulation (EMS) device in patients with patellofemoral pain known as anterior knee pain. Usual treatment for… Expand
ConditionsPatellofemoral Pain Syndrome
InterventionDevice, Other
Addition of hip exercises to treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: A meta-analysis
TLDR
If the addition of hip-strengthening exercises decreases pain and improves function in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome is determined. Expand
Patellofemoral pain syndrome in female athletes: A review of diagnoses, etiology and treatment options
TLDR
Conservative management, including optimizing muscle balance between the vastus medialis and lateralis around the patella along with formal therapy should be the first line of treatment in patients presenting with PFPS. Expand
Systematic Review of the Effect of Taping Techniques on Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
TLDR
This systematic review supports knee taping only as an adjunct to traditional exercise therapy for PFPS; however, it does not support taping in isolation. Expand
Effectiveness of therapeutic physical exercise in the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review
TLDR
The intervention programs that were most effective in relieving pain and improving function in patellofemoral pain syndrome included proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching and strengthening exercises for the hip external rotator and abductor muscles and knee extensor muscles. Expand
Effects of strength training on the treatment of patellofemoral pain syndrome – a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials
TLDR
A quantitative analysis on the effectiveness of strength training at reducing pain in PFPS sufferers showed a statistically positive response in the treatment of PFPS. Expand
Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome.
TLDR
Treatment of PFPS includes rest, a short course of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and physical therapy directed at strengthening the hip flexor, trunk, and knee muscle groups, and surgery is considered a last resort. Expand
[The Influence of Foot Orthoses on Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: A Systematic Analysis of the Literature].
  • A. Ahlhelm, M. Alfuth
  • Medicine
  • Sportverletzung Sportschaden : Organ der Gesellschaft fur Orthopadisch-Traumatologische Sportmedizin
  • 2015
TLDR
Foot orthoses seem to be an effective treatment device in the therapy for PFPS with an immediate and long-term reduction in pain and an improvement of function occurred following the intervention. Expand
Hip posterolateral musculature strengthening in sedentary women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized controlled clinical trial with 1-year follow-up.
TLDR
Knee-stretching and -strengthening exercises supplemented by hip posterolateral musculature-streng strengthening exercises were more effective than knee exercises alone in improving long-term function and reducing pain in sedentary women with PFPS. Expand
Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome: An Update
TLDR
Physical therapy continues to be the mainstay of conservative management of patients with PFPS, with a focus on a multimodal treatment approach with an individualized therapy plan based on anatomic and biomechanical factors. Expand
Treatment of Lateral Knee Pain Using Soft Tissue Mobilization in Four Female Triathletes
  • J. Winslow
  • Medicine
  • International journal of therapeutic massage & bodywork
  • 2014
TLDR
After ruling out common causes for lateral knee pain such as lateral meniscus tear, lateral collateral ligament sprain, patellofemoral dysfunction, osteochondral injury, biceps femoris tendonitis, iliotibial band friction syndrome or osteoarthritis, soft tissue restriction should be considered a potential source of dysfunction. Expand
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References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 47 REFERENCES
An update for the conservative management of patellofemoral pain syndrome: a systematic review of the literature from 2000 to 2010.
TLDR
Current evidence supports the continued use of quadriceps exercise for the conservative management of PFPS, but inconsistent or limited data regarding the other interventions precluded the authors' ability to make conclusive recommendations about their use. Expand
Management of patellofemoral pain syndrome.
TLDR
To confirm the diagnosis of PFPS, an examination of the knee focusing on the patella and surrounding structures is essential, and there is little evidence to support the routine use of knee braces or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Expand
Patellar taping for patellofemoral pain syndrome in adults.
TLDR
The currently available evidence from trials reporting clinically relevant outcomes is low quality and insufficient to draw conclusions on the effects of taping, whether used on its own or as part of a treatment programme. Expand
Knee arthroscopy and exercise versus exercise only for chronic patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized controlled trial
TLDR
The outcome in this controlled trial involving patients with chronic PFPS was no better than when the home exercise program was used alone, and direct healthcare costs in the arthroscopy group were estimated to exceed on average those of the control group by €901 per patient. Expand
Pharmacotherapy for patellofemoral pain syndrome.
TLDR
This review aims to summarise the evidence of effectiveness of pharmacotherapy in reducing anterior knee pain and improving knee function in people with PFPS. Expand
A Systematic Review of Physical Interventions for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
TLDR
There appears to be a consistent improvement in short-term pain and function due to physiotherapy treatment, but comparison with a placebo group is required to determine efficacy, and further trials are warranted for the other interventions. Expand
Immediate Effect and Predictors of Effectiveness of Taping for Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
TLDR
Taping was an effective treatment for patellofemoral pain syndrome, but was less effective in patients with higher body mass index, larger lateral patell ofemoral angle, and smaller Q angle. Expand
Hip posterolateral musculature strengthening in sedentary women with patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized controlled clinical trial with 1-year follow-up.
TLDR
Knee-stretching and -strengthening exercises supplemented by hip posterolateral musculature-streng strengthening exercises were more effective than knee exercises alone in improving long-term function and reducing pain in sedentary women with PFPS. Expand
Knee arthroscopy and exercise versus exercise only for chronic patellofemoral pain syndrome: 5-year follow-up
TLDR
The RCT, being the first of its kind, indicates that the 5-year outcome in most of the patients with chronic PFPS treated with knee arthroscopy and home exercise programme or with the home Exercise programme only is equally good in both groups. Expand
Effectiveness of different exercises and stretching physiotherapy on pain and movement in patellofemoral pain syndrome: a randomized controlled trial
TLDR
A proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation intervention protocol combined with aerobic exercise showed a better outcome than a classic stretching protocol after four months. Expand
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