A Review of the Fossil Record of Turtles of the Clade Pan-Kinosternoidea

@article{Joyce2016ARO,
  title={A Review of the Fossil Record of Turtles of the Clade Pan-Kinosternoidea},
  author={Walter G. Joyce and Jason R. Bourque},
  journal={Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History},
  year={2016},
  volume={57},
  pages={57 - 95}
}
  • W. JoyceJason R. Bourque
  • Published 19 April 2016
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History
Abstract Turtles of the total clade Pan-Kinosternoidea have a relatively poor fossil record that extends back to the Late Cretaceous (Campanian). The clade is found only in North America during its early history, but dispersed to Central America no later than the Miocene and to South America no later than the Pleistocene. Ancestral pan-kinosternoids were likely aquatic, bottom-walking omnivores or carnivores that preferred low-energy freshwater habitats. The Pan-Dermatemys lineage is often… 

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  • Geography, Environmental Science
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Snapping turtles (Pan-Chelydridae) play an important role in modern ecosystems throughout North America, but their fossil record is notably poor. We here describe a new species of fossil

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The character-states of the skull and skeleton of L. tokaryki indicate that morphological changes occurring during the diversification of Kinosternoidea were more complex than expected based on data from derived members of the group.

A nomenclature for fossil and living turtles using phylogenetically defined clade names

This work converts the vast majority of previously defined clade names for extinct and extant turtles into this new nomenclatural framework, and establishes 113 clade Names, of which 79 had already received phylogenetic definitions and 34 are new.

The macroevolutionary and developmental evolution of the turtle carapacial scutes

It is argued that turtles with complete loss of scutes follow clade-specific macroevolutionary regimes, which are distinct from the majority of other turtles, and a parallel is drawn between the variation of scute patterns on the carapace of turtles and the scale patterns in the pileus region of squamates.

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Turtles of the total clade Pan-Chelydridae have a relatively sparse fossil record that reaches back to the Late Cretaceous (Santonian) but spread along unclear routes to Asia and Europe during the Paleocene, only to go extinct on those continents by the end of the Pliocene.

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