Corpus ID: 59488307

A Review of The Risks and Benefits of Cosleeping

@inproceedings{Tyler2011ARO,
  title={A Review of The Risks and Benefits of Cosleeping},
  author={B. Tyler},
  year={2011}
}
Cosleeping” is defined as a child sleeping in the same bed as an adult within arm’s reach. The literature on cosleeping identifies a number of risks and benefits to infants, but many questions remain unanswered. Proponents of cosleeping assert that the research supports the benefits of cosleeping. Proponents report reduced rates of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), increased rates of breastfeeding, the instinctive nature of cosleeping. Opponents of cosleeping generally report opposite… Expand

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 66 REFERENCES
Cosleeping and Sleep Behavior in Italian School-Aged Children
TLDR
Cosleeping seems to reflect a parent’s way to cope with sleep problems, and the long persistence of this practice may be related to the lifestyle of families. Expand
Where Will the Baby Sleep? Attitudes and Practices of New and Experienced Parents Regarding Cosleeping with Their Newborn Infants
An evolutionary perspective on human infant sleep physiology suggests that parent-infant cosleeping, practiced under safe conditions, might be beneficial to both mothers and infants. However,Expand
Why babies should never sleep alone: a review of the co-sleeping controversy in relation to SIDS, bedsharing and breast feeding.
TLDR
It is hoped that the studies and data described in this paper, which show that co-sleeping at least in the form of roomsharing especially with an actively breast feeding mother saves lives, is a powerful reason why the simplistic, scientifically inaccurate and misleading statement 'never sleep with your baby' needs to be rescinded. Expand
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TLDR
It is concluded that co-sleeping should have significant implications for infants' neurobehavioral development, based on extensive evidence for long-term effects of early stress. Expand
Parenting advice books about child sleep: cosleeping and crying it out.
TLDR
A medical perspective on sleep predominates in parenting advice in this area, typically opposed to cosleeping and supportive of sleep training. Expand
Infants bed-sharing with mothers
TLDR
The publication in the Lancet of the European Concerted Action on sudden infant death syndrome (ECAS study) resulted in front page headlines such as “Don’t sleep with your baby” yet the ECAS study said nothing new about bed-sharing and cot death. Expand
SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE: Is Infant-Parent Cosleeping Protective?
TLDR
A survey of cross-cultural data and laboratory findings suggest that where infant-parent cosleeping and breastfeeding are practiced in tandem in nonsmoking households, and are practiced by parents specifically to promote infant health, the chances of an infant dying from SIDS should be reduced. Expand
A Comparison of the Sleep–Wake Patterns of Cosleeping and Solitary-Sleeping Infants
TLDR
The percent of the nighttime spent awake did not differ between groups, suggesting that cosleeping infants had shorter awakenings, and also whether they spent the majority of the night sleeping face-to-face, as previously reported. Expand
Cosleeping in context: sleep practices and problems in young children in Japan and the United States.
TLDR
The experience of the Japanese families indicates that cosleeping per se is not associated with increased sleep problems in early childhood, and cultural differences seem to influence the relationship between sleep practices and sleep problems. Expand
Unsafe sleep practices and an analysis of bedsharing among infants dying suddenly and unexpectedly: results of a four-year, population-based, death-scene investigation study of sudden infant death syndrome and related deaths.
TLDR
It is found that similar unsafe sleeping practices occurred in the large majority of cases diagnosed as SIDS, accidental suffocation, and cause undetermined, and recommendations that infants sleep supine on firm sleep surfaces that lessen the risk of entrapment or head covering have the potential to save many lives. Expand
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