A Review of “The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution”

@article{Fahs2011ARO,
  title={A Review of “The Case of the Female Orgasm: Bias in the Science of Evolution”},
  author={Breanne Fahs},
  journal={Journal of Sex \& Marital Therapy},
  year={2011},
  volume={37},
  pages={161 - 163}
}
  • Breanne Fahs
  • Published 28 February 2011
  • Biology
  • Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy
Picking off the foremost evolutionary theories for the occurrence of female orgasm, Elizabeth Lloyd presents a precise, well-argued, fantastically researched, devastating attack on the scientific “... 

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Therapists' Constructions of Practice in Relation to Women Experiencing Orgasm Difficulty: A Foucauldian Discourse Analysis

The aim of this thesis is to explore how clinicians construct their practice with women experiencing difficulty with orgasm, by adopting a Foucauldian Discourse Analysis (FDA). In the first part, a

Human Female Orgasm as Evolved Signal: A Test of Two Hypotheses

  • Ryan M. EllsworthDrew H. Bailey
  • Psychology, Biology
    Archives of Sexual Behavior
  • 2013
Results suggest that male satisfaction with, investment in, and sexual fidelity to a mate are benefits that favored the selection of orgasmic signaling in ancestral females.

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