A Reconstruction of Regional and Global Temperature for the Past 11,300 Years

@article{Marcott2013ARO,
  title={A Reconstruction of Regional and Global Temperature for the Past 11,300 Years},
  author={S. Marcott and J. Shakun and P. Clark and A. Mix},
  journal={Science},
  year={2013},
  volume={339},
  pages={1198 - 1201}
}
  • S. Marcott, J. Shakun, +1 author A. Mix
  • Published 2013
  • Computer Science, Medicine
  • Science
  • Exceptional Now The climate has been warming since the industrial revolution, but how warm is climate now compared with the rest of the Holocene? Marcott et al. (p. 1198) constructed a record of global mean surface temperature for more than the last 11,000 years, using a variety of land- and marine-based proxy data from all around the world. The pattern of temperatures shows a rise as the world emerged from the last deglaciation, warm conditions until the middle of the Holocene, and a cooling… CONTINUE READING
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