A Reconsideration of the Link between the Energetics of Water and of ATP Hydrolysis Energy in the Power Strokes of Molecular Motors in Protein Structures

@article{Widdas2008ARO,
  title={A Reconsideration of the Link between the Energetics of Water and of ATP Hydrolysis Energy in the Power Strokes of Molecular Motors in Protein Structures},
  author={W. F. Widdas},
  journal={International Journal of Molecular Sciences},
  year={2008},
  volume={9},
  pages={1730 - 1752}
}
  • W. F. Widdas
  • Published 1 September 2008
  • Biology
  • International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Mechanical energy from oxygen metabolism by mammalian tissues has been studied since 1837. The production of heat by mechanical work was studied by Fick in about 1860. Prior to Fick’s work, energetics were revised by Joule’s experiments which founded the First Law of Thermodynamics. Fenn in 1923/24 found that frog muscle contractions generated extra heat proportional to the amount of work done in shortening the muscle. This was fully consistent with the Joule, Helmholtz concept used for the… 

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