A Reassessment of the Taxonomic Position of Mesosaurs, and a Surprising Phylogeny of Early Amniotes

@article{Laurin2017ARO,
  title={A Reassessment of the Taxonomic Position of Mesosaurs, and a Surprising Phylogeny of Early Amniotes},
  author={Michel Laurin and Graciela Pi{\~n}eiro},
  journal={Frontiers in Earth Science},
  year={2017},
  volume={5},
  pages={88}
}
We reassess the phylogenetic position of mesosaurs by using a data matrix that is updated and slightly expanded from a matrix that the first author published in 1995 with his former thesis advisor. The revised matrix, which incorporates anatomical information published in the last twenty years and observations on several mesosaur specimens (mostly from Uruguay) includes seventeen terminal taxa and 129 characters (four more taxa and five more characters than the original matrix from 1995). The… 

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