A Quiet Leader Unites Researchers in Drive for the Next Big Machine

@article{Cho2006AQL,
  title={A Quiet Leader Unites Researchers in Drive for the Next Big Machine},
  author={Adrian Cho},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={312},
  pages={1128 - 1129}
}
  • A. Cho
  • Published 26 May 2006
  • Engineering, Medicine
  • Science
BATAVIA, ILLINOIS-- As head of the design team for the International Linear Collider, Barry Barish has physicists around the globe pulling together. But can the governments of the world afford their enormous particle smasher? (Read more.) 
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