A Quantitative Study of Social Organization in Open Source Software Communities

@article{Zanetti2012AQS,
  title={A Quantitative Study of Social Organization in Open Source Software Communities},
  author={Marcelo Serrano Zanetti and Emre Sarig{\"o}l and Ingo Scholtes and Claudio J. Tessone and Frank Schweitzer},
  journal={ArXiv},
  year={2012},
  volume={abs/1208.4289}
}
The success of open source projects crucially depends on the voluntary contributions of a sufficiently large community of users. Apart from the mere size of the community, interesting questions arise when looking at the evolution of structural features of collaborations between community members. In this article, we discuss several network analytic proxies that can be used to quantify different aspects of the social organisation in social collaboration networks. We particularly focus on… 

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