A Primer on the Understanding, Use, and Calculation of Confidence Intervals that are Based on Central and Noncentral Distributions

@article{Cumming2001APO,
  title={A Primer on the Understanding, Use, and Calculation of Confidence Intervals that are Based on Central and Noncentral Distributions},
  author={Geoff Cumming and Sue Finch},
  journal={Educational and Psychological Measurement},
  year={2001},
  volume={61},
  pages={532 - 574}
}
  • G. Cumming, S. Finch
  • Published 1 August 2001
  • Psychology
  • Educational and Psychological Measurement
Reform of statistical practice in the social and behavioral sciences requires wider use of confidence intervals (CIs), effect size measures, and meta-analysis. The authors discuss four reasons for promoting use of CIs: They (a) are readily interpretable, (b) are linked to familiar statistical significance tests, (c) can encourage meta-analytic thinking, and (d) give information about precision. The authors discuss calculation of CIs for a basic standardized effect size measure, Cohen’s δ (also… 
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