A Path-Deformation Framework for Determining Weighted Genome Rearrangement Distance

@article{Bhatia2020APF,
  title={A Path-Deformation Framework for Determining Weighted Genome Rearrangement Distance},
  author={Sangeeta Bhatia and Attila Egri-Nagy and Stuart Serdoz and Cheryl E. Praeger and Volker Gebhardt and Andrew R. Francis},
  journal={Frontiers in Genetics},
  year={2020},
  volume={11}
}
Measuring the distance between two bacterial genomes under the inversion process is usually done by assuming all inversions to occur with equal probability. Recently, an approach to calculating inversion distance using group theory was introduced, and is effective for the model in which only very short inversions occur. In this paper, we show how to use the group-theoretic framework to establish minimal distance for any weighting on the set of inversions, generalizing previous approaches. To do… 
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