A Partnership Framework for Managing an Emerging Urban Region: The Bonny Experiment in Rivers State, Nigeria

  • Opuenebo Binya Owei
  • Published 2004

Abstract

Nigeria is urbanizing at an astonishing pace. Compared to growth rate of around 3.0 per cent for the total population, the urban population in Nigeria over the last three decades has been growing close to 5.8 per cent per annum. This is among the highest urban growth rates in the world, due mainly to migration from rural to urban areas (Federal Government of Nigeria, 2003). However successive administrations have failed to manage its urban areas through proper planning and service provision. This has culminated in problems of well-known crisis proportions including severe housing shortages, lack of every type of urban infrastructure, poor urban quality of life. In the wake of the oil and gas based economy in the country, Bonny, a medium sized urban area in the Niger Delta region, with a rich historical and cultural past emerged as one of the nation’s fastest growing urban centers. The most significant factor responsible for this growth is the location of oil and gas export facilities on the island. The community mobilized by the traditional ruler decided to initiate actions aimed at ensuring not only orderly physical development, but also promoting the economic interest of its citizens. This gave rise to the formation of a partnership between the community and the companies operating in the area and led to the signing of a Memorandum of Understanding in 1998, and one that was initiated by the community. This partnership constitutes the basis for managing growth in the Bonny urban region.

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Cite this paper

@inproceedings{Owei2004APF, title={A Partnership Framework for Managing an Emerging Urban Region: The Bonny Experiment in Rivers State, Nigeria}, author={Opuenebo Binya Owei}, year={2004} }