A Partial Skeleton of a New Lamniform Mackerel Shark from the Miocene of Europe

@inproceedings{Kriwet2014APS,
  title={A Partial Skeleton of a New Lamniform Mackerel Shark from the Miocene of Europe},
  author={J{\"u}rgen Kriwet and Heike Mewis and Oliver Hampe},
  year={2014}
}
Cenozoic lamniform sharks are mostly represented by isolated teeth and vertebrae, whereas articulated skeletal remains are usually very scarce. Here, we describe a partial skeleton of an extinct lamniform shark consisting of 42 slightly disarticulated teeth, 49 vertebrae, and additional unidentifiable cranial and postcranial remains. The specimen originates from the Miocene mica-clay of Groß Pampau (North Germany), which is of late Langenfeldian age (= Serravallian-Tortonian boundary; middle… 

Articulated remains of the extinct shark Ptychodus (Elasmobranchii, Ptychodontidae) from the Upper Cretaceous of Spain provide insights into gigantism, growth rate and life history of ptychodontid sharks

Two large shark vertebrae from the Santonian of Spain are described, which show a unique combination of characters (asterospondylic calcification pattern, with concentric lamellae and numerous parallel bands that are oriented perpendicular) that is only known from ptychodontid sharks.

Body, jaw, and dentition lengths of macrophagous lamniform sharks, and body size evolution in Lamniformes with special reference to ‘off-the-scale’ gigantism of the megatooth shark, Otodus megalodon

It is contended that ovoviviparous reproduction involving intrauterine cannibalism, a possible synapomorphy of Lamniformes, to be another plausible driver for the evolution of endothermy achieved by certain lamniform taxa.

Biomechanical insights into the dentition of megatooth sharks (Lamniformes: Otodontidae)

It is proposed that the evolution of gigantism in extinct otodontid sharks was paralleled by a series of drastic modifications in their dentition, and that this pattern most likely emerged as a non-functional by-product of heterochronic processes driven by selection towards larger body sizes.

Eocene sand tiger sharks (Lamniformes, Odontaspididae) from the Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätte, Italy: palaeobiology, palaeobiogeography and evolutionary significance

The unambiguous first report of this lamniform shark in the Eocene Bolca Konservat-Lagerstätte improves knowledge concerning the diversity and palaeobiology of the cartilaginous fishes of this palaeontological site, and provides new insights about the biotic turnovers that involved the high trophic levels of the marine settings after the end-Cretaceous extinction.

THE SOUTHERNMOST OCCURRENCE OF BRACHYCARCHARIAS (LAMNIFORMES, ODONTASPIDIDAE) FROM THE EOCENE OF ANTARCTICA PROVIDES NEW INFORMATION ABOUT THE PALEOBIOGEOGRAPHY AND PALEOBIOLOGY OF PALEOGENE SAND TIGER SHARKS

The first record of one of the most common and widespread Paleogene selachians, the sand tiger shark Brachycarcharias , in the Ypresian strata of the La Meseta Formation, Seymour Island, Antarctica,

The extinct shark Otodus megalodon was a transoceanic superpredator: Inferences from 3D modeling

Although shark teeth are abundant in the fossil record, their bodies are rarely preserved. Thus, our understanding of the anatomy of the extinct Otodus megalodon remains rudimentary. We used an

Registro de Carcharocles megalodon en el sector oriental de la Cuenca del Guadalquivir (Mioceno superior, Sur de España)

Tortonian diatomites of the San Felix Quarry (Porcuna), in the Eastern Guadalquivir Basin, have given isolated marine vertebrate remains that include a large shark tooth (123.96 mm from apex to the

Probing the Ecology and Climate of the Eocene Southern Ocean With Sand Tiger Sharks Striatolamia macrota

Results indicate an early Drake Passage opening with Pacific inputs during TELM 2–3 (45–43 Ma) based on single unit variation with an overall radiogenic trend, and comparison with climate model results suggests that increased CO2 produces warm conditions that also parsimoniously explain the observations.

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