• Corpus ID: 107836294

A PASSIVELY TRIGGERED FOOT SNARE DESIGN FOR AMERICAN BLACK BEARS TO REDUCE DISTURBANCE BY NON-TARGET ANIMALS

@inproceedings{Reagan2002APT,
  title={A PASSIVELY TRIGGERED FOOT SNARE DESIGN FOR AMERICAN BLACK BEARS TO REDUCE DISTURBANCE BY NON-TARGET ANIMALS},
  author={Steven Richard Reagan and Janet M. Ertel and Peter Stinson and Paul M. Yakupzack and Don Anderson},
  year={2002}
}
American black bears (Ursus americanus) are commonly captured throughout their range for research or management purposes. How- ever, with the most commonly used capture devices, capture of non-target animals and disturbance of traps can substantially reduce capture effi- ciency. Here, we describe a passively-triggered snare designed to capture black bears and reduce such trap disturbance. The passively triggered snare system was designed to secure the snare to the foot of the bear as it… 

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