A Note on the Transformation of White, Black and Yellow Shamanism in the History of the Mongols

@article{Hesse1986ANO,
  title={A Note on the Transformation of White, Black and Yellow Shamanism in the History of the Mongols},
  author={Klaus Hesse},
  journal={Studies In History},
  year={1986},
  volume={2},
  pages={17 - 30}
}
  • K. Hesse
  • Published 1 February 1986
  • Psychology
  • Studies In History
the shamanism of his clan of Djelme Uriankhan and the Mongolian people in their glorious past. With reference to the Yellow Faith (Buddhism, lamaism) and Christianity, both of which suppressed shamanism, one of his major concerns was to show that Mongolian shamanism was a self-reliant, elaborate and a far from primitive belief system, and still a living tradition among his people. He himself relied in his studies on his own knowledge of the traditions of his people and on some written… 

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