A Note on Extinct Languages of Northwest Mexico of Supposed Uto-Aztecan Affiliation

@article{Miller1983ANO,
  title={A Note on Extinct Languages of Northwest Mexico of Supposed Uto-Aztecan Affiliation},
  author={W. R. Miller},
  journal={International Journal of American Linguistics},
  year={1983},
  volume={49},
  pages={328 - 334}
}
  • W. R. Miller
  • Published 1983
  • History
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
A number of languages in northwest Mexico, for which we have little or no linguistic data, became extinct in the early colonial period. Most of the extant languages in this area are Uto-Aztecan, and thus it is often assumed that many or most of the extinct languages were also Uto-Aztecan: a reasonable assumption, but one which does not automatically make them Uto-Aztecan. The problem has received passing attention from a number of scholars, with a tendency for one scholar to utilize (with or… Expand
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  • International Journal of American Linguistics
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0. Introduction. Over the years many have used linguistic evidence of various kinds and in various ways in the quest for parsimonious solutions to the many problems of Uto-Aztecan prehistory.Expand
The Classification of the Uto-Aztecan Languages Based on Lexical Evidence
  • W. R. Miller
  • Sociology
  • International Journal of American Linguistics
  • 1984
0. Introduction. There has been a notable lack of agreement among informed scholars on the classification of the Uto-Aztecan languages. The problem revolves around the family-tree approach versus theExpand
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