A New Stem Hynobiid Salamander (Urodela, Cryptobranchoidea) from The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) of Liaoning Province, China

@article{Jia2019ANS,
  title={A New Stem Hynobiid Salamander (Urodela, Cryptobranchoidea) from The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) of Liaoning Province, China},
  author={Jia Jia and Ke-Qin Gao},
  journal={Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology},
  year={2019},
  volume={39},
  pages={1 - 22}
}
  • J. Jia, K. Gao
  • Published 4 March 2019
  • Geography, Environmental Science
  • Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
ABSTRACT Hynobiids are a group of small- to moderate-sized salamanders living primarily in Asia. They are a primitive crown-group clade, with a poor fossil record. Several hynobiid-like taxa have been discovered from the Lower Cretaceous strata of northern China during the last 20 years, with Liaoxitriton zhongjiani and Nuominerpeton aquilonaris identified as the oldest known stem hynobiids. However, the record of pre-Cretaceous hynobiid-like taxa is only known by Liaoxitriton daohugouensis, of… 
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