A New Species of The Genus Homo From Olduvai Gorge

@article{Leakey1964ANS,
  title={A New Species of The Genus Homo From Olduvai Gorge},
  author={Louis S. B. Leakey and Phillip V. Tobias and John Russell Napier},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1964},
  volume={202},
  pages={7-9}
}
on the west side of Lake Natron, some fifty miles north-east of Olduvai Gorge. Initial exploration of this area was carried out under the leadership of my son, Richard Leakey, who was later joined by Mr. Glynn Isaac, who took charge of the scientific side of the work. Mrs. Isaac, Mr. Richard Rowe and Philip Leakey also took part, as well as a number of our African staff. On January 11 one of our African staff, Mr. Kamoya Kimeu, located a magnificient fossil hominid jaw in situ (see Figs. 6 and… Expand

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