A New Species of Long-Eared Bat (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) from Sardinia (Italy)

@inproceedings{Mucedda2002ANS,
  title={A New Species of Long-Eared Bat (Chiroptera, Vespertilionidae) from Sardinia (Italy)},
  author={Mauro Mucedda and Andreas Kiefer and Ermanno Pidinchedda and Michael Veith},
  year={2002}
}
We describe a new species of long-eared bat, genus Plecotus, from the island of Sardinia (Italy). The new species is clearly distinguishable from other European Plecotus species by its mitochondrial 16S rRNA gene (4.1–9.6% sequence divergence) as well as by a unique combination of morphological characters such as brownish colour of dorsal pelage, a relatively large thumb and thumb claw, an almost cylindrical form of the penis and the characteristic shape of the baculum. The most important… 
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Long-eared bats of the genus Plecotus are widespread over most of temperate Eurasia, marginally reaching the African continent and Macaronesia. Previously, all African populations were assigned to
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Genetic, morphological and geographical data, and genetic evidence at three mitochondrial markers revealed exclusive haplotypes for S. meridionalis well separated from those of S. vulgaris and previously published results based on nuclear markers further support the taxonomic hypothesis.
Description of a new species of Wormaldia from Sardinia and a new Drusus species from the Western Balkans (Trichoptera, Philopotamidae, Limnephilidae)
Abstract New species are described in the genera Wormaldia (Trichoptera, Philopotamidae) and Drusus (Trichoptera, Limnephilidae, Drusinae). Additionally, the larva of the new species Drusus
An African bat in Europe, Plecotus gaisleri: Biogeographic and ecological insights from molecular taxonomy and Species Distribution Models
TLDR
The results remark the role of Italy as a bat diversity hotspot in the Mediterranean and highlight the need to include P. gaisleri in European faunal checklists and conservation directives, confirming the usefulness of combining different approaches to explore the presence of cryptic species outside their known ranges—a fundamental step to informing conservation.
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