A New Model for Progenitor Systems of Type Ia Supernovae

@article{Hachisu1996ANM,
  title={A New Model for Progenitor Systems of Type Ia Supernovae},
  author={Izumi Hachisu and Mariko Kato and Ken’ichi Nomoto},
  journal={The Astrophysical Journal Letters},
  year={1996},
  volume={470},
  pages={L97 - L100}
}
We propose a new model for progenitor systems of Type Ia supernovae. The model consists of an accreting white dwarf and a lobe-filling, low-mass red giant. When the mass accretion rate exceeds a certain critical rate, there is no static envelope solution on the white dwarf. For this case, we find a new strong wind solution, which replaces the static envelope solution. Even if the mass-losing star has a deep convective envelope, the strong wind stabilizes the mass transfer until the mass ratio… 

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