A New Genus of African Monkey, Rungwecebus: Morphology, Ecology, and Molecular Phylogenetics

@article{Davenport2006ANG,
  title={A New Genus of African Monkey, Rungwecebus: Morphology, Ecology, and Molecular Phylogenetics},
  author={Tim R. B. Davenport and William T. Stanley and Eric J. Sargis and Daniela W. De Luca and Noah E. Mpunga and Sophy J. Machaga and Link E. Olson},
  journal={Science},
  year={2006},
  volume={312},
  pages={1378 - 1381}
}
A new species of African monkey, Lophocebus kipunji, was described in 2005 based on observations from two sites in Tanzania. We have since obtained a specimen killed by a farmer on Mount Rungwe, the type locality. Detailed molecular phylogenetic analyses of this specimen demonstrate that the genus Lophocebus is diphyletic. We provide a description of a new genus of African monkey and of the only preserved specimen of this primate. We also present information on the animal's ecology and… Expand
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