A New Factor in Evolution

@article{BaldwinANF,
  title={A New Factor in Evolution},
  author={James Mark Baldwin},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  volume={30},
  pages={441 - 451}
}
  • J. Baldwin
  • Published 1 June 1896
  • Biology, Medicine, Physics
  • The American Naturalist
In several recent publications I have developed, from different points of view, some considerations which tend to bring out a certain influence at work in organic evolutionwhich I venture to call “a new factor.” I give below a list of references1 to these publications and shall refer to them by number as this paper proceeds. The object of the present paper is to gather into one sketch an outline of the view of the process of development which these different publications have hinged upon. The… 

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