A New Basal Salamandroid (Amphibia, Urodela) from the Late Jurassic of Qinglong, Hebei Province, China

@article{Jia2016ANB,
  title={A New Basal Salamandroid (Amphibia, Urodela) from the Late Jurassic of Qinglong, Hebei Province, China},
  author={J. F. Jia and Ke-Qin Gao},
  journal={PLoS ONE},
  year={2016},
  volume={11}
}
A new salamandroid salamander, Qinglongtriton gangouensis (gen. et sp. nov.), is named and described based on 46 fossil specimens of juveniles and adults collected from the Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) Tiaojishan Formation cropping out in Hebei Province, China. The new salamander displays several ontogenetically and taxonomically significant features, most prominently the presence of a toothed palatine, toothed coronoid, and a unique pattern of the hyobranchium in adults. Comparative study of the… 
A new hynobiid-like salamander (Amphibia, Urodela) from Inner Mongolia, China, provides a rare case study of developmental features in an Early Cretaceous fossil urodele
TLDR
Comparison of adult with larval and postmetamorphic juvenile specimens provides insights into developmental patterns of cranial and postcranial skeletons in this fossil species, especially resorption of the palatine and anterior portions of thePalatopterygoids in the palate and the coronoid in the mandible during metamorphosis, and post metamorphic ossification of the mesopodium in both manus and pes.
A New Stem Hynobiid Salamander (Urodela, Cryptobranchoidea) from The Upper Jurassic (Oxfordian) of Liaoning Province, China
  • J. Jia, K. Gao
  • Geography, Environmental Science
    Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology
  • 2019
ABSTRACT Hynobiids are a group of small- to moderate-sized salamanders living primarily in Asia. They are a primitive crown-group clade, with a poor fossil record. Several hynobiid-like taxa have
The first record of a nearly complete choristodere (Reptilia: Diapsida) from the Upper Jurassic of Hebei Province, People’s Republic of China
Choristodera are freshwater aquatic reptiles known from the Middle Jurassic to the Miocene. Their fossil record shows a peak in diversity in the Early Cretaceous of eastern Asia, most notably in the
Restudy of Regalerpeton weichangensis ( Amphibia : Urodela ) from the Lower Cretaceous of Hebei , China
TLDR
Phylogenetic analysis suggests Regalerpeton, Jeholotriton and Pangerpeton should be placed in the suborder Salamandroidea with three synapomorphies, which indicates that they represent an important stage of evolution in the CryptobranchoideaSalamandroideA split.
A new palaeontinid (Insecta, Hemiptera, Cicadomorpha) from the Upper Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation of northeastern China and its biogeographic significance
Abstract. Cicadomorpha guancaishanensis new species, of the extinct family Palaeontinidae, is described from the Upper Jurassic Tiaojishan Formation at Guancaishan, Jianping County, Western Liaoning,
Comparative osteology of the hynobiid complex Liua‐Protohynobius‐Pseudohynobius (Amphibia, Urodela): Ⅰ. Cranial anatomy of Pseudohynobius
TLDR
A bone‐by‐bone study of the cranium in the five extant species of Pseudohynobius is provided based on x‐ray computer tomography data for 18 specimens, indicating that the cr skull in each of these species has a combination of differences in morphology, proportions and articulation patterns in both dermal and endochondral bones.
Osteology of Batrachuperus yenyuanensis (Urodela, Hynobiidae), a high-altitude mountain stream salamander from western China
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The species may well have achieved its current distribution in western Sichuan before the drastic uplift of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau in Pliocene, indicating that the biogeographic origin and historical evolution of the species are closely associated with the orogeny of the Hengduan Mountains and formation of the Yalong River.
An Updated Review of the Middle‐Late Jurassic Yanliao Biota: Chronology, Taphonomy, Paleontology and Paleoecology
The northeastern Chinese Yanliao Biota (sometimes called the Daohugou Biota) comprises numerous, frequently spectacular fossils of non‐marine organisms, occurring in Middle‐Upper Jurassic strata in
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