A Neurological Comparative Study of the Harp Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) Brain

@article{Walle2010ANC,
  title={A Neurological Comparative Study of the Harp Seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and Harbor Porpoise (Phocoena phocoena) Brain},
  author={Solveig Wall{\o}e and N. Eriksen and T. Dabelsteen and B. Pakkenberg},
  journal={The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2010},
  volume={293}
}
The cetacean brain is well studied. However, few comparisons have been done with other marine mammals. In this study, we compared the harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus) and the harbor porpoise brain (Phocoena phocoena). Stereological methods were applied to compare three areas of interest: the entire neocortex and two subdivisions of the neocortex, the auditory and visual cortices. The total number of neurons and glial cells in the three regions was estimated. The main results showed that the… Expand
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