A Nested Case–Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)

@inproceedings{Murphy2016ANC,
  title={A Nested Case–Control Study of Metabolically Defined Body Size Phenotypes and Risk of Colorectal Cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)},
  author={Neil Murphy and Amanda J. Cross and Mustapha Abubakar and M. Jenab and Krasimira Aleksandrova and Marie-Christine Boutron-Ruault and Laure Dossus and Antoine Racine and Tilman K{\"u}hn and Verena Andrea Katzke and Anne Tj\onneland and Kristina E. N. Petersen and Kim Overvad and Jos{\'e} Ram{\'o}n Quir{\'o}s and Paula Jakszyn and Esther Molina-Montes and Miren Dorronsoro and Jos{\'e}-Mar{\'i}a Huerta and Aurelio Barricarte and Kay-Tee Khaw and Nicholas J Wareham and Ruth C. Travis and Antonia Trichopoulou and Pagona Lagiou and Dimitirios Trichopoulos and Giovanna Masala and Vittorio Krogh and Rosario Tumino and Paolo Vineis and Salvatore Panico and Hendrik Bas Bueno-de-Mesquita and Peter D. Siersema and P. H. Peeters and Bodil Ohlsson and Ulrika Ericson and Richard Palmqvist and Hanna Nystr{\"o}m and Elisabete Weiderpass and Guri Skeie and Heinz Freisling and So Yeon Joyce Kong and Kostas Tsilidis and David C Muller and Elio Riboli and Marc J. Gunter},
  booktitle={PLoS medicine},
  year={2016}
}
BACKGROUND Obesity is positively associated with colorectal cancer. Recently, body size subtypes categorised by the prevalence of hyperinsulinaemia have been defined, and metabolically healthy overweight/obese individuals (without hyperinsulinaemia) have been suggested to be at lower risk of cardiovascular disease than their metabolically unhealthy (hyperinsulinaemic) overweight/obese counterparts. Whether similarly variable relationships exist for metabolically defined body size phenotypes and… CONTINUE READING
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