A Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual Coercion

@inproceedings{Thornhill2000ANH,
  title={A Natural History of Rape: Biological Bases of Sexual Coercion},
  author={Randy Thornhill and Craig T. Palmer},
  year={2000}
}
In this controversial book, Randy Thornhill and Craig Palmer use evolutionary biology to explain the causes of rape and to recommend new approaches to its prevention. According to Thornhill and Palmer, evolved adaptation of some sort gives rise to rape; the main evolutionary question is whether rape is an adaptation itself or a by-product of other adaptations. Regardless of the answer, Thornhill and Palmer note, rape circumvents a central feature of women's reproductive strategy: mate choice… Expand
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References

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Evolutionary theory lacks a term for a crucial concept—a feature, now useful to an organism, that did not arise as an adaptation for its present role, but was subsequently coopted for its currentExpand
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TLDR
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