A NEW CONDOR (CICONIIFORMES, VULTURIDAE) FROM THE LATE MIOCENE/EARLY PLIOCENE PISCO FORMATION, PERU

@inproceedings{Stucchi2005ANC,
  title={A NEW CONDOR (CICONIIFORMES, VULTURIDAE) FROM THE LATE MIOCENE/EARLY PLIOCENE PISCO FORMATION, PERU},
  author={Marcelo Stucchi and Steven D. Emslie},
  year={2005}
}
Abstract We report the oldest fossil condor (Vulturidae) from South America and the first from the Pisco Formation (14.0–2.0 Ma) of Peru, described herein as Perugyps diazi new genus and species. The Pisco Formation, exposed on the southern coast of Peru, has produced well-preserved and abundant marine and terrestrial vertebrate fossils from the late Miocene/early Pliocene (6.0–4.5 Ma) Montemar and Sacaco Sur localities, from where P. diazi was recovered. The new condor adds to our knowledge on… 
First Pleistocene South American Teratornithidae (Aves): New Insights into the Late Evolutionary History of Teratorns
ABSTRACT The first unequivocal records of teratornithid birds from the Pleistocene of South America are here described, adding a new member, and the largest, to this highly diversified guild of large
Late Neogene evolution of the Peruvian margin and its ecosystems: a synthesis from the Sacaco record
The highly productive waters of the Humboldt Current System (HCS) host a particular temperate ecosystem within the tropics, whose history is still largely unknown. The Pisco Formation, deposited
NUEVOS RESTOS DE PROCELLARIIFORMES (AVES) DE LA FORMACIÓN PISCO, PERÚ NEW REMAINS OF PROCELLARIIFORMES (AVES) FROM THE
TLDR
The Procellariiformes fauna of the Pisco formation supports the proposal of the existence of a cold marine current since the ending of the Miocene in the south Pacific.
Phylogenetic affinities and morphology of the Pliocene cathartiform Dryornis pampeanus Moreno & Mercerat
TLDR
The fossil bird Dryornis pampeanus Moreno & Mercerat, is reinterpreted after examination of new referred material from the Pliocene Chapadmalal Formation of Argentina, and is emended in the light of important considerations that cast doubt on the previous attribution of the taxon to condors.
The Basal Penguin (Aves: Sphenisciformes) Perudyptes devriesi and a Phylogenetic Evaluation of the Penguin Fossil Record
TLDR
These two species, known from relatively complete partial skeletons, are the oldest crown clade penguin fossils and represent well-corroborated temporal calibration points for the Spheniscus-Eudyptula divergence and Megadyptes-EUDyptes divergence, respectively.
Scaphokogia totajpe, sp. nov., a New Bulky-Faced Pygmy Sperm Whale (Kogiidae) from the Late Miocene of Peru
TLDR
The cranial morphology of Scaphokogia totajpe indicates that the extent of the nasal complex was greater than in modern kogiids, and highlights a late Miocene diversity peak for sperm whales in the global oceans, before the Pliocene odontocete turnover.
Bio-Connections Between Southern Continents: What is and What is Not Possible to Conclude
TLDR
Characters of the South American avian fossil record are presence of taxa with uncertain affinities and the absence of Passeriformes during the Paleogene; progressive and accelerated increase of species starting at the Neogene (Miocene); and predominance of the zoophagous birds in all the associations under scrutiny.
Mitogenomic analysis of extant condor species provides insight into the molecular evolution of vultures
The evolution of large vultures linked to mountainous habitats was accompanied by extreme physiological and behavioral specializations for energetically efficient flights. However, little is known on
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 30 REFERENCES
An early condor-like vulture from North America
TLDR
A new genus and species of condor-like vulture is described from the middle Miocene (Barstovian) of North America and is the earliest condor now known in the New World.
New Fossil Material With A Redescription Of The Extinct Condor Gymnogyps Varonai (Arredondo, 1971) From The Quaternary Of Cuba (Aves : Vulturidae)
TLDR
The Cuban Condor is characterized by distinct cranial and premaxillary features that are associated with more powerful musculature for feeding, and became specialized on the limited large prey available there during the Pleistocene.
LOS CÓNDORES (CICONIIFORMES, VULTURIDAE) DE LA REGIÓN PAMPEANA DE LA ARGENTINA DURANTE EL CENOZOICO TARDÍO: DISTRIBUCIÓN, INTERACCIONES y EXTINCIONES
The fossil record of condors from the Upper Cenozoic of the Pampean region is rich and diverse. The declination, retraction in range and extinction of many taxa of "pampean" condors during
Avian Community, Climate, and Sea-level Changes in the Plio-Pleistocene of the Florida Peninsula
  • S. Emslie
  • Environmental Science, Geography
  • 1998
---Eleven previously unidentified fossil avifaunas from Pliocene and Pleistocene localities in the Florida peninsula are presented, within which are included the description of a new species of
A CONDOR FROM THE UPPER PLIOCENE OF KANSAS
TLDR
Although the Rexroad tarsometatarsus is certainly cathartid, it differs from other known genera of the family at least as much as they differ from each other, and is here assigned to a new genus and species.
Geology and paleontology of late Cenozoic marine deposits in the Sacaco area (Peru)
ZusammenfassungPaläontologische, stratigraphische und geochronologische (K-Ar) Daten belegen ein obermiozänes und pliozänes Alter der Pisco-Formation. Die Sequenz wird etwa 350 m mächtig und besteht
Geology and paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina
Ray, Clayton E., editor. Geology and Paleontology of the Lee Creek Mine, North Carolina, I. Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology, number 53, 529 pages, frontispiece, 95 figures, 101 plates, 8
Competitive interactions within and between species in a guild of Avian scavengers
-We observed Andean Condors (Vultur gryphus), King Vultures (Sarcoramphus papa), Black Vultures (Coragyps atratus), Turkey Vultures (Cathartes aura), and Crested Caracaras (Polyborus plancus)
The fossil history and phylogenetic relationships of condors (Ciconiiformes: Vulturidae) in the New World
TLDR
A phylogenetic analysis of 39 cranial and postcranial characters indicates that the condors form a monophyletic assemblage with Gymnogyps as a distinct North American genus, and Vultur as a separate South American genus.
...
...